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Fridays 6-7pm on CJSR 88.5FM

What’s Happening in Class this Week

April 30th, 2021The Final, Final Class!

And that is a wrap folks! Tonight is our last class after two terms packed full of incredible learning, stores, ideas, and sharing. We want to thank you all so very much for the sticking with us as we learned together. Thank you for your support, non of this could have happened with out the generosity of everyone who participated. We will keep this site up for a while so you can keep coming back and exploring everything that is here. We will also continue, excitedly, to accept submissions. As long as the site is up you will be able to receive certificates by completing activities that are posted on the activity tab.

It has been a privilege to meet and speak with so many incredible people doing really cool things in the world. We appreciate each and every activity submission that you sent in. Thank you!

We want to also thank MorningStar, An, Jay, and Jason for all the production and content help!

Thank you and don’t forget that we are still around. You can always email us at hum101@ualberta.ca or give us a call/text at 587-709-5472.

Kendra and Lisa

April 16th, 2021Book Woman Podcast

This week we are stoked to air an episode of the Book Woman Podcast, a “podcast where three Métis aunties figure out how to publish, edit, and write Indigenous stories.” You might recognize the voice of Tanya Ball, who we interviewed about Metis Storytelling and trickster stories for our second class. In this episode, Tanya, Kayla and Sheila interview  Chelsea Vowel and Molly Swain, hosts of Métis in Space, to chat about storytelling through podcasting. You can check out more of the Book Woman Podcast here: https://bookwomenpodcast.ca/
and you can listen to the brilliant Métis in Space podcast here: http://www.metisinspace.com/

April 2nd, 2021Autobiography

This week we explore people telling the stories of their own lives, choosing what they would like to share and how they would like to share it. We meet a University of Alberta instructor, Julie Rak, who studies and teaches courses in autobiography. She shares with us how telling our stories can not only influence the future, but it also shapes our past and present in new ways. Julie speaks of the importance of autobiography, not just for the writers, but also in creating a world that better understands the unique experiences, needs, and knowledge that all people have within them.

We also meet two local authors who write about their lives and communities of belonging: Nisha Patel and Darrin Hagen. Darrin Hagen chronicles Edmonton’s Queer history through drag performance, playwriting and queer history tours. Nisha Patel, Edmonton’s poet laureate, who uses poetry, in her own words, to speak to the diaspora and the identities she occupies, and all the ways they weigh her down and lift her up. She is a poet, public speaker, artist and executive director of the Edmonton Poetry Festival. She is active, engaged, and fearless in her support and advocacy.

March 26th, 2021Museums and Storytelling

This week we have a new class we are excited to share with you. We continue to receive incredible submissions from you, the listeners and students, and needed a new class to make sure we were able to share. There were also many class ideas that never got made as we ran out of time, this week we bring you one of those classes.

We meet Celina Loyer, an Aboriginal Programmer with Musée Héritage Museum, and Amy Samson, a Heritage Sites Curator with Musée Héritage Museum. They share with us their experiences and knowledge of working within museums in their different roles. Together we discuss how museums tell stories that not only shape our understanding of history, but also how we understand the present. Both Celina and Amy work to challenge how and whose stories are being told in museums.

March 19th, 2021 – Music and Storytelling part 3 – Chubby Cree

Well here we are, part 3 of Music and Storytelling, there really was just too much! The need for a third class was clear after we recorded Chubby Cree live at the Starlite Room. And by we, I mean Jason Borys (of Ag47 and Borys) and Kris Harper (of Ag47 and nêhiyawak, you can hear our interview with Kris on week 7, or part 1 of Music and Storytelling).

This week we share an interview with Chubby Cree as well as a few of their songs that they recorded that day with us. Chubby Cree is a women-led, Indigenous drumming group that drums to heal – to heal Mother Earth and the people who live here. As Carol Powder, the founder and leader of Chubby Cree, says in an article for Windspeaker, “the reason I sing is because I know our drums connect to the people we lost.”

In addition to getting the incredible pleasure of hearing and learning from Chubby Cree, we also interview Jason Borys. Each week you listen to some of Jason’s work as he, along with Kris Harper, wrote the music that starts and ends each class. Not only is Jason an incredible musician, but he is also a very successful sound engineer and, as such, has listened to more stories than most of us will hear in a lifetime. This week you can tune into our conversation with Jason about the stories he has heard and the stories he tells.

March 12, 2021Music and Storytelling part 2

It’s December and we are 8 weeks in! This week week’s class is part 2 of Music and Storytelling. We meet some more local musicians, both from the hip hop scene: DJ CreeAsian and MC Tzadeka. A DJ is a disc jockey. DJ was used in the origins of hip hop to describe the person who “scratches” the records. A DJ would spend countless hours finding hooks, riffs, breaks and beats on a vinyl record and then would use incredible skill and technique to locate and create patterns within songs recorded to vinyl. Then using incredible eye hand coordination, they would drop the needle at precise spots on the vinyl record and often move the record back and forth creating the music that an MC would rap over. But I am no historian, nor do I have a strong understanding of hip hop. Here is one, of many, resources where you can find more information on the development of “scratching” or turntabling. The MC (or emcee) is the person who raps in hip hop. They are the one who “spits” the “rhymes”.

This week’s class is introduced by a UofA instructor, Brian Fauteux, who teaches classes in popular music. Unlike me, he is a historian when it comes to music. This week he shares a bit of the long and complex history of American recorded popular music.

We are winding the term down and are planning the last classes. We would like to include your stories as we wrap the learning up. If you haven’t yet checked out the activities page, please head over there. If you would like to have your story shared on air, we will need them soon. If you have questions or concerns you can reach us at 587-709-5472 or hum101@ualberta.ca.

March 5, 2021Music and Storytelling part 1

This week we meet Kris Harper, from nêhiyawak and Ag47 (the band who wrote the class’ theme music), he talks with us about his journey as a storyteller. We learn about his own journey and also the journey he has taken alongside other great local artists. He speaks about the impact that colonization has had on his family, community, and life and also the recorded American music industry. He leaves us excited to hear what is yet to come!

We also have a local luthier Leila Sidi, of TunaTone Instruments, who shares with us her journey to guitar making. By focusing her guitar making on accessibility, she makes storytelling through music possible for many people and voices that have been overlooked in conventional guitar design.

But it wouldn’t be a show about music without some music! We asked Leila and Kris to share some songs with us, so turn up the dial and tune in!

February 26, 2021More than Words

This week we meet Zane Hamm, Mpoe Mogale, and Morẹ́nikẹ́ Ọláòṣebìkan. Zane is an instructor from the UofA that spends a lot of time thinking about how images can be used as a way to share and explore people’s past, present, and future. Mpoe is a trained dancer and movement based artist who share with us how they use their body to challenge us through art. Morẹ́nikẹ́ is the founder of Ribbon Rouge Foundation. Ribbon Rouge Foundation uses art as a tool of positive social change for African, Caribbean, and Black individuals and communities impacted by HIV. Morẹ́nikẹ́ speaks to us not just about the power of story, but the also the power of listening.

As always we ran out of time to share all that our guests wanted to. Specifically this week, Mpoe led a movement exercise at the beginning of our interview for you to participate in. It was intended to introduce us to how Mpoe views movement and to also ground and focus us for the conversation. Unfortunately, we just didn’t have time to squeeze it in this week. There was just so many incredible things said.

Because it is a great exercise and a part of Mpoe’s practice for us to participate in, we are sharing it here:

Mpoe’s movement exercise

Don’t forget to check out the resources for each class. There is a lot of great stuff posted to help us keep the conversations going. We also post articles, videos, stories and such that our guests refer to in interviews but we don’t have time to talk about on air. In case you are new to this thing, hover your mouse over the “resource” tab at the top of this page and a drop down menu should appear with the weeks on it. Each week is packed full of interesting stuff that we continue to update. It is there for you, so enjoy!

February 19, 2021East African Storytelling

Take a trip across the ocean with us this week as we learn about the traditions, practice, and role of storytelling in East Africa. Not only is this week’s class full of interesting ideas, learning, and people doing cool things, but there are also a couple of amazing stories from internationally celebrated storytellers Chunga Otiende (founder of Story Makers Society in Kenya) and Tololwa Mollel!

If you are curious about the practice of storytelling, our guests this week have some great ideas of how to sharpen your telling practices to entertain and educate your audiences.

As you will hear, storytelling plays a very important role in East Africa, and across Africa as a whole. Africa is a VERY large continent, and in case you need a geography refresher, here is a map to explore while listening to tonights class.

Don’t forget about the activities, they count towards a certificate and are meant to be help us engage with the course material. Just a reminder that they will not be marked or judged. They are for you and us to enjoy. And if you share them with us we can post them on the website or share them over the air (but only with our permission). We have some new activities up on the activities page.

February 12, 2021Storytelling and Food

This week we will be meeting Kyla Pascal, Juanita Gnanapragasm, Mishma Mukith, and Alexis Hillyard as we discuss how food tells a story, and how food creates space and comfort for storytelling. Each of our guests shares how food is a place where they have discovered new stories and how food can be used to create opportunities for voices we don’t often hear to share their stories. Eating is a matter of survival, and many of our guests will argue that so are stories. So why not combine the two, and have some fun eating and swapping stories!

Let’s take a cue from Boyle as he get’s Captain Raymond Holt thinking about food in this clip from Brooklyn 99:

Brooklyn 99

You will find some recipes posted under resources for this week and we hope that this will inspire you to share a recipe and food story with us! With your permission we can post these online and maybe share on air! You can send your recipes to us however works best for you, all our contact info can be found on our contact page.

February 5th, 2021Indigenous Storytelling part 2

Last week we left off in the middle of a few conversations and this week we pickup on them. We will hear more from Elder Bonny and Josh Longuedoc. We will also meet Naomi McIlwraith, an incredible local Mêtis poet and writer. We recognize that we have only a few voices and Nations represented in these two Indigenous Storytelling classes, and that there is much more to learn than can happen in two classes, or two lifetimes. There are over 600 First Nations in what we now know as Canada, and we encourage you to listen to some of the many stories that these Nations hold unique to them and the teachings they hold. Tanya Ball, from last week, generously shared a reading list to start us off. You can find it here: https://hum101onair.files.wordpress.com/2020/11/tanya-balls-reading-list-1.pdf

January 29th , 2021Indigenous Storytelling

Thank you everyone who was able for tuning in last week! And if you missed last week you can always listen here, under “week 1” under the resource tab. You can also check us out on spotify: https://open.spotify.com/show/3w6285PbyzLvmEyNrkWM69

Further thinking about what we learned last week and how Cree language and knowledge tells a different story than “Edmonton” and the settler colonial experiences here, this is a beautiful short film that introduces us to a different story and understanding of this place as Edmonton and the river that runs through it: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nAa0R3AD_mM&feature=youtu.be&fbclid=IwAR07GokdRWnxS8STIQzet-Kb42ORGwofuUjLJiJy6SYV4I7_lXN7AQ1OlsY

This week we should be on at 6:00pm and we will be learning about Indigenous Storytelling. We have three incredible guests joining us: Elder Bonny Spencer, Josh Languedoc (a playwright from Saugeen Nation), and Tanya Ball (a Michif woman and part of the amazing Book Woman podcast).

Did you hear the theme music? It is so great and generously gifted to us by Kris Harper and Jason Borys of Ag47. Thank you! We will have more from them on an upcoming class on music and storytelling.

If you are left with questions and curiosities, as we are sure you will be, check the things we have to help us dig deeper into what our guests share with us. If you don’t have consistent, secure access to a computer let us know and we can get you copies of the materials.

Lastly, we have an activity posted that we hope you will try out and share with us. It is a poetic introduction. We already have one submitted “I am From” poem and are excited to be sharing it with you on the air! We would also love to share yours, so if you feel comfortable send it our way. If you would rather not share on air we will just keep the enjoyment of reading your poetic introduction to ourselves. You can send it anyway that is on our contact page, and if you need stamped envelopes to use the post let us know.

This week we will be talking about Indigenous stories. Thomas King is a very well known Indigenous storyteller. Here is an excerpt from his book, “The Truth about Stories”: https://houseofanansi.com/blogs/anansi/an-excerpt-from-the-truth-about-stories-by-thomas-king-1 It has lots of important things to say about stories while also using stories to teach. If you have some time, give it a read.

January 15th, 2021The Final Class!

It is with mixed emotions that we put together this final class. What a term it has been! Each guest was incredible, and editing the interviews was always a challenge. We hope to get some longer clips up online over the next couple of months so check back for that. Learning how to put together a radio show (from recording to airing) was overwhelming at times, but kept us busy and engaged. Needless to say, we haven’t been bored this term.

This term has highlighted the importance of connecting. Connecting through stories, through voices, through ideas, and through listening. As much as we missed seeing faces each week, we were also so thrilled to learn of the connections that were happening because of radio.

We want to thank everyone who made this happen. Thank you An and Jay, our extraordinary volunteers who were always quick to help out with our last-minute panics! Thank you MorningStar for being the best intern ever! The kits that many of you enjoyed, could not have happened without MorningStar. Thank you MorningStar for all the behind-the-scenes support.

Thank you so much Jason Borys for all the support. That email you sent a few months back was a gift we are so glad we opened! You have been so willing to accommodate the rushed business of getting shows done with a very short turn-around. We appreciate so much the sound skills you have so generously shared with us. Thank you also for your kindness, thoughtfulness, and care. Thank you Jason!

Thank you to everyone who has tuned in over the past 13 weeks. Knowing that you were on the other side of the radio listening was what made this all happen! An extra special thank you to all those who shared their activities with us. Your stories have been incredible and receiving them lifted the program in ways we cannot articulate. Thank you!

Even though this is the last class, it is not over yet . . .

Starting next week, January 22nd, the entire term will be re-airing here on CJSR – same time, same place. For those who have just started with us, there are many great classes to catch up on, and for those who have been listening from the beginning, we are sure you will hear some new things as you tune in again. 

We are also planning, fingers crossed, to produce one new class each month, so if you haven’t had a chance to share activities and stories with us, please do so and we can include them in new upcoming classes. We also have a tonne of materials online if you have access to the internet. This will also be updated as we move forward, so keep checking in.

And don’t forget to watch us on facebook as we post updates there.

And keep those activity submissions coming. We will have certificates in the mail to those who have already submitted activities and, if you haven’t submitted an activity yet, but are still wanting a certificate, there is still loads of time as we have another 13 weeks of classes! If you have any question or concerns about certificates you can call or email us. 

January 8th, 2021WRIP and Poetics

We hope everyone who tuned in over the holidays enjoyed Tanya, Kayla and Sheila of the Book Woman Podcast, as they interviewed fellow podcasters, Molly Swain and Chelsea vowel about their show metis in space. Métis In Space is a podcast where, “MOLLY AND CHELSEA, DRINK A BOTTLE OF (RED) WINE AND, FROM A TIPSY, DECOLONIAL PERSPECTIVE, REVIEW A SCI-FI MOVIE OR TELEVISION EPISODE FEATURING INDIGENOUS PEOPLES, TROPES AND THEMES.”

On New years day, we listened to another podcast episode, this one from The Keep Moving podcast, a show about leisure and gentrification in downtown Edmonton. Rylan and Alex share interviews with folks living and moving through downtown Edmonton, with a focus on those who have been displaced and/or criminalized as a result of the development of the quarters and arena district. 

Hum has always been rooted in relationships with others thinking and creating in the city. We are so grateful for the different projects, like the podcasts we listened to over the holidays, that uplift voices in the city and celebrate the power of story to bring people together. 

This week is another take over class by the incredible Writing Revolution In Place Collective (WRIP). WRIP is a “community based research collective that uses poetic and creative research strategies to study topics that shape our different lives in the city. Each WRIP term takes up a different topic, they have studied: treaty 6, gentrification, the TRC, and they are currently studying how gender intersects with other structures of power to shape our most intimate and institutional encounters”. WRIP is run out of the Learning Centre Literacy Association.

We also have a longer conversation with Christine Stewart, an instructor from the UofA, about poetics and the importance of thinking about how language works to shape and make sense of our everyday world. Words have the power to uplift and oppress, this is important for us to think about, it means that we can reshape our world and the worlds of others through language. Check out the resources page from this week for more reading and thinking about this.

Next week is, alas, our final class for this term and it must be a celebration! We are thinking of a dance party, with loud music and some shaking and singing. So send us your favourite dance tunes and we will make a playlist to celebrate our making it happen in spite of Covid! Send your music picks to hum101@ualberta.ca or text them to 587-709-5472.

After our final class we will start from the beginning. For those who have just started with us, there are many great classes to catchup on, and for those who have been listening from the beginning, we are sure you will hear some new things as you tune in again. It is also a great time to start working on those activities!

December 21st, 2020End of the year update

As the year wraps up we have some interruptions to our weekly classes.

This week we are stoked to air an episode of the Book Woman Podcast, a “podcast where three Métis aunties figure out how to publish, edit, and write Indigenous stories.” You might recognize the voice of Tanya Ball, who we interviewed about Metis Storytelling and trickster stories for our second class. In this episode, Tanya, Kayla and Sheila interview  Chelsea Vowel and Molly Swain, hosts of Métis in Space, to chat about storytelling through podcasting. You can check out more of the Book Woman Podcast here: https://bookwomenpodcast.ca/
and you can listen to the brilliant Métis in Space podcast here: http://www.metisinspace.com/

Then the following Friday, January 1st, we are excited to share the introductory episode of Keep Moving, a podcast about leisure and gentrification in Edmonton. Hum Alumn, you might recognize Rylan’s voice, or perhaps some listeners might recognize the voices of those interviewed. We are so grateful that Rylan and Alex agreed to share this episode with us, and can’t wait to hear what the show has in store next. You can follow Keep Moving on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/keepmovingpodcast/ or listen to the non-radio version of the show on their website: https://keepmovingpodcast.com/

We are back on January 8th for our last class, which is another take-over class! Stay tuned for details . . .

*Note: the 15th is our LAST CLASS! In a typical year we would spend our last class eating, laughing, and receiving certificates. But, as we continue to do our best to keep ourselves and others safe during this pandemic, we will be broadcasting our party to you over the airwaves! And we really do want to have some party so please, share your favourite dance tunes with us, so we can turn up the volume and celebrate together. We did this! We had an incredible term in spite of the need for us to learn a part this term.

Send your songs to hum101@ualberta.ca or text them to us 587-709-5472

December 18th, 2020Autobiography

Even though we could have had at least a dozen more classes on music, clearly something Kendra and I are passionate about, it was time to move it on. This week we explore people telling the stories of their own lives, choosing what they would like to share and how they would like to share it. We meet a University of Alberta instructor, Julie Rak, who studies and teaches courses in autobiography. She shares with us how telling our stories can not only influence the future, but it also shapes our past and present in new ways. Julie speaks of the importance of autobiography, not just for the writers, but also in creating a world that better understands the unique experiences, needs, and knowledge that all people have within them.

We also meet two local authors who write about their lives and communities of belonging: Nisha Patel and Darrin Hagen. Darrin Hagen chronicles Edmonton’s Queer history through drag performance, playwriting and queer history tours. Nisha Patel, Edmonton’s poet laureate, who uses poetry, in her own words, to speak to the diaspora and the identities she occupies, and all the ways they weigh her down and lift her up. She is a poet, public speaker, artist and executive director of the Edmonton Poetry Festival. She is active, engaged, and fearless in her support and advocacy.

December 11th, 2020Music and Storytelling part 3 – Chubby Cree

Well here we are, part 3 of Music and Storytelling, there really was just too much! The need for a third class was clear after we recorded Chubby Cree live at the Starlite Room. And by we, I mean Jason Borys (of Ag47 and Borys) and Kris Harper (of Ag47 and nêhiyawak, you can hear our interview with Kris on week 7, or part 1 of Music and Storytelling).

This week we share an interview with Chubby Cree as well as a few of their songs that they recorded that day with us. Chubby Cree is a women-led, Indigenous drumming group that drums to heal – to heal Mother Earth and the people who live here. As Carol Powder, the founder and leader of Chubby Cree, says in an article for Windspeaker, “the reason I sing is because I know our drums connect to the people we lost.”

In addition to getting the incredible pleasure of hearing and learning from Chubby Cree, we also interview Jason Borys. Each week you listen to some of Jason’s work as he, along with Kris Harper, wrote the music that starts and ends each class. Not only is Jason an incredible musician, but he is also a very successful sound engineer and, as such, has listened to more stories than most of us will hear in a lifetime. This week you can tune into our conversation with Jason about the stories he has heard and the stories he tells.

It is another great week of stories and music, so tune into CJSR 88.5FM from 6-7pm this Friday, December 11th for another Humanities 101 class!

December 4th, 2020Music and Storytelling part 2

It’s December and we are 8 weeks in! This week week’s class is part 2 of Music and Storytelling. We meet some more local musicians, both from the hip hop scene: DJ CreeAsian and MC Tzadeka. A DJ is a disc jockey. DJ was used in the origins of hip hop to describe the person who “scratches” the records. A DJ would spend countless hours finding hooks, riffs, breaks and beats on a vinyl record and then would use incredible skill and technique to locate and create patterns within songs recorded to vinyl. Then using incredible eye hand coordination, they would drop the needle at precise spots on the vinyl record and often move the record back and forth creating the music that an MC would rap over. But I am no historian, nor do I have a strong understanding of hip hop. Here is one, of many, resources where you can find more information on the development of “scratching” or turntabling. The MC (or emcee) is the person who raps in hip hop. They are the one who “spits” the “rhymes”.

This week’s class is introduced by a UofA instructor, Brian Fauteux, who teaches classes in popular music. Unlike me, he is a historian when it comes to music. This week he shares a bit of the long and complex history of American recorded popular music.

We are winding the term down and are planning the last classes. We would like to include your stories as we wrap the learning up. If you haven’t yet checked out the activities page, please head over there. If you would like to have your story shared on air, we will need them soon. If you have questions or concerns you can reach us at 587-709-5472 or hum101@ualberta.ca.

November 27th, 2020Music and Storytelling part 1

This week we meet Kris Harper, from nêhiyawak and Ag47 (the band who wrote the class’ theme music), he talks with us about his journey as a storyteller. We learn about his own journey and also the journey he has taken alongside other great local artists. He speaks about the impact that colonization has had on his family, community, and life and also the recorded American music industry. He leaves us excited to hear what is yet to come!

We also have a local luthier Leila Sidi, of TunaTone Instruments, who shares with us her journey to guitar making. By focusing her guitar making on accessibility, she makes storytelling through music possible for many people and voices that have been overlooked in conventional guitar design.

But it wouldn’t be a show about music without some music! We asked Leila and Kris to share some songs with us, so turn up the dial and tune in!

November 20th, 2020More than Words

This week we meet Zane Hamm, Mpoe Mogale, and Morẹ́nikẹ́ Ọláòṣebìkan. Zane is an instructor from the UofA that spends a lot of time thinking about how images can be used as a way to share and explore people’s past, present, and future. Mpoe is a trained dancer and movement based artist who share with us how they use their body to challenge us through art. Morẹ́nikẹ́ is the founder of Ribbon Rouge Foundation. Ribbon Rouge Foundation uses art as a tool of positive social change for African, Caribbean, and Black individuals and communities impacted by HIV. Morẹ́nikẹ́ speaks to us not just about the power of story, but the also the power of listening.

As always we ran out of time to share all that our guests wanted to. Specifically this week, Mpoe led a movement exercise at the beginning of our interview for you to participate in. It was intended to introduce us to how Mpoe views movement and to also ground and focus us for the conversation. Unfortunately, we just didn’t have time to squeeze it in this week. There was just so many incredible things said.

Because it is a great exercise and a part of Mpoe’s practice for us to participate in, we are sharing it here:

Mpoe’s movement exercise

Don’t forget to check out the resources for each class. There is a lot of great stuff posted to help us keep the conversations going. We also post articles, videos, stories and such that our guests refer to in interviews but we don’t have time to talk about on air. In case you are new to this thing, hover your mouse over the “resource” tab at the top of this page and a drop down menu should appear with the weeks on it. Each week is packed full of interesting stuff that we continue to update. It is there for you, so enjoy!

November 13th, 2020East African Storytelling

Take a trip across the ocean with us this week as we learn about the traditions, practice, and role of storytelling in East Africa. Not only is this week’s class full of interesting ideas, learning, and people doing cool things, but there are also a couple of amazing stories from internationally celebrated storytellers Chunga Otiende (founder of Story Makers Society in Kenya) and Tololwa Mollel!

If you are curious about the practice of storytelling, our guests this week have some great ideas of how to sharpen your telling practices to entertain and educate your audiences.

As you will hear, storytelling plays a very important role in East Africa, and across Africa as a whole. Africa is a VERY large continent, and in case you need a geography refresher, here is a map to explore while listening to tonights class.

Don’t forget about the activities, they count towards a certificate and are meant to be help us engage with the course material. Just a reminder that they will not be marked or judged. They are for you and us to enjoy. And if you share them with us we can post them on the website or share them over the air (but only with our permission). We have some new activities up on the activities page.

November 6th, 2020Storytelling and Food

This week we will be meeting Kyla Pascal, Juanita Gnanapragasm, Mishma Mukith, and Alexis Hillyard as we discuss how food tells a story, and how food creates space and comfort for storytelling. Each of our guests shares how food is a place where they have discovered new stories and how food can be used to create opportunities for voices we don’t often hear to share their stories. Eating is a matter of survival, and many of our guests will argue that so are stories. So why not combine the two, and have some fun eating and swapping stories!

Let’s take a cue from Boyle as he get’s Captain Raymond Holt thinking about food in this clip from Brooklyn 99:

Brooklyn 99

You will find some recipes posted under resources for this week and we hope that this will inspire you to share a recipe and food story with us! With your permission we can post these online and maybe share on air! You can send your recipes to us however works best for you, all our contact info can be found on our contact page.

October 30th, 2020Indigenous Storytelling part 2

Last week we left off in the middle of a few conversations and this week we pickup on them. We will hear more from Elder Bonny and Josh Longuedoc. We will also meet Naomi McIlwraith, an incredible local Mêtis poet and writer. We recognize that we have only a few voices and Nations represented in these two Indigenous Storytelling classes, and that there is much more to learn than can happen in two classes, or two lifetimes. There are over 600 First Nations in what we now know as Canada, and we encourage you to listen to some of the many stories that these Nations hold unique to them and the teachings they hold. Tanya Ball, from last week, generously shared a reading list to start us off. You can find it here: https://hum101onair.files.wordpress.com/2020/11/tanya-balls-reading-list-1.pdf

October 23rd, 2020Indigenous Storytelling

Thank you everyone who was able for tuning in last week! There was a mixup at the studio and we ended up on late, we hope that you were able to hang on and listen past 7:00 to hear Kokom Constance and MorningStar’s beautiful conversation, where they share stories and memories. If you weren’t able to stick around, you can always listen here, under “week 1” under the resource tab. And if you missed the whole show, we encourage you to listen online. You can also check us out on spotify: https://open.spotify.com/show/3w6285PbyzLvmEyNrkWM69

Further thinking about what we learned last week and how Cree language and knowledge tells a different story than “Edmonton” and the settler colonial experiences here, this is a beautiful short film that introduces us to a different story and understanding of this place as Edmonton and the river that runs through it: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nAa0R3AD_mM&feature=youtu.be&fbclid=IwAR07GokdRWnxS8STIQzet-Kb42ORGwofuUjLJiJy6SYV4I7_lXN7AQ1OlsY

This week we should be on at 6:00pm and we will be learning about Indigenous Storytelling. We have three incredible guests joining us: Elder Bonny Spencer, Josh Languedoc (a playwright from Saugeen Nation), and Tanya Ball (a Michif woman and part of the amazing Book Woman podcast).

Did you hear the theme music? It is so great and generously gifted to us by Kris Harper and Jason Borys of Ag47. Thank you! We will have more from them on an upcoming class on music and storytelling.

If you are left with questions and curiosities, as we are sure you will be, check the things we have to help us dig deeper into what our guests share with us. If you don’t have consistent, secure access to a computer let us know and we can get you copies of the materials.

Lastly, we have an activity posted that we hope you will try out and share with us. It is a poetic introduction. We already have one submitted “I am From” poem and are excited to be sharing it with you on the air! We would also love to share yours, so if you feel comfortable send it our way. If you would rather not share on air we will just keep the enjoyment of reading your poetic introduction to ourselves. You can send it anyway that is on our contact page, and if you need stamped envelopes to use the post let us know.

This week we will be talking about Indigenous stories. Thomas King is a very well known Indigenous storyteller. Here is an excerpt from his book, “The Truth about Stories”: https://houseofanansi.com/blogs/anansi/an-excerpt-from-the-truth-about-stories-by-thomas-king-1 It has lots of important things to say about stories while also using stories to teach. If you have some time, give it a read.

October 16th, 2020the first class

You found us! Here we are on the world wide web.

We are going to assume that you are here because you are participating or thinking about participating in Humanities 101 on the air.

For those of you who don’t know, Humanities 101 (HUM) is a free, non-credit, university-level course offered to those who face financial, systemic, and institutional barriers to post-secondary. It is a program that is is made possible by the University of Alberta and Community Service-Learning.

HUM challenges what a university classroom looks like. There are no pre-requisites and we recognize the depth of knowledge that is gained through lived experience. HUM recognizes multiples ways of knowing and learning. We all come with things to learn and things to share with others.

Typically we have hold classes both on and off campus. But this year, due to Covid-19, we are moving on air. We have teamed up with the community radio station CJSR 88.5FM to deliver a course through the radio!

The theme for this term is “Storytelling”. We go through life listening and telling stories. “There are two sides to every story”, a familiar reminder that stories are complicated and not always as they seem. Over the next months we will explore how stories shape our everyday experiences. Each week we will be introduced to ideas from storytellers, professors and Hum participants. We will discuss how stories come to be, how they are told, the power stories hold to shape our lives and views and much more. There will also be some incredible stories for us to listen to and learn from!

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